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think pink think zeta

Throughout each semester, Zeta Tau Alpha at Georgia Tech supports our national philanthropy, strengthens relations with other Greek organizations through philanthropy, and prioritizes time participating in external community service.

Our chapter hosts many events to support our national philanthropy, Breast Cancer Education and Awareness. Every spring semester we host our annual Strawberry Festival where we raise over $15,000 by selling strawberries. We host Think Pink Weeks every semester to help raise awareness for Breast Cancer. In addition, we support GT baseball, football and basketball by hosting/attending Pink Out games. In the fall of 2018, we started a Rumble For the Ribbon event where people on the GT campus pay to create teams and compete in a flag football competition. The money raised at this fun event all goes to our national philanthropy! We also focus on philanthropy outside of Breast Cancer Education and Awareness by hosting sandwich making, card crafting, and education presentation events, many times with other Greek organizations around campus.

Individually, our members invest in many external philanthropies as well. Collectively, our women completed over 250 hours of work with For The Kids, 140 hours with BOPSOP, and 110 hours with "The whY", in addition to hours spent volunteering for many other organizations.



What our philanthropy means to us..

 
I love that within ZTA, we are a group of women working together to support other women. Statistically, 1 in 8 women and 1 in 25 men are affected by breast cancer in their lifetime. Sadly, many of our mothers, aunts, cousins, and grandmothers have fought their own battles with breast cancer, so we fight for them. We also fight for the future, so that fewer lives of the next generation are taken by this disease.  We work to raise awareness as well as support the education of those who may be able to finally find a cure. Why are education and awareness important? Personally, it’s important to me because this cause is so personal to women worldwide, including many sisters in our own chapter. Many women and men who may be at risk for breast cancer aren’t aware of their risks and don’t think to check in often with their bodies. The longer breast cancer goes unnoticed in the body, the more deadly it can be - this is why awareness and empowerment are so important for saving lives. Until a cure is found, we will proudly fight against this disease as a united sisterhood.  Sincerely,  Morgan Keller, VP of Philanthropy

I love that within ZTA, we are a group of women working together to support other women. Statistically, 1 in 8 women and 1 in 25 men are affected by breast cancer in their lifetime. Sadly, many of our mothers, aunts, cousins, and grandmothers have fought their own battles with breast cancer, so we fight for them. We also fight for the future, so that fewer lives of the next generation are taken by this disease.

We work to raise awareness as well as support the education of those who may be able to finally find a cure. Why are education and awareness important? Personally, it’s important to me because this cause is so personal to women worldwide, including many sisters in our own chapter. Many women and men who may be at risk for breast cancer aren’t aware of their risks and don’t think to check in often with their bodies. The longer breast cancer goes unnoticed in the body, the more deadly it can be - this is why awareness and empowerment are so important for saving lives. Until a cure is found, we will proudly fight against this disease as a united sisterhood.

Sincerely,

Morgan Keller, VP of Philanthropy

 
My maternal grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer back in 2009 at age the age of only 68. Within months, testing revealed that her cancer was stage 4, which is almost always terminal. Knowing that some of the best doctors in the world are in Boston, she moved from Florida and lived with us during her fight. My mom took her to appointments and we got to be close with her in a time where she needed us most. She battled, with hormone suppression and then a very aggressive chemo schedule, for just over a year and died at age 69. However, I always cherish those special few months we had with her under our roof.  My maternal great-grandmother also had postmenopausal breast cancer. She was diagnosed and had a lumpectomy and oral treatment. She ended up passing away from the cancer at 92.  After having two family members diagnosed, my own mom worried about her risk. After some concerns following a mammogram, she ended up needing bilateral biopsies. The results were thankfully clear she is still a 30% risk of having breast cancer, which scares her every day.  And lastly, a few years ago, my paternal aunt had suspicious spots (stage 1) and opted for a lumpectomy, as well as radiation and chemo as an extra precaution. She beat breast cancer and has been cancer-free for over 12 years, although the fear of relapse exists for all survivors.  Breast cancer has touched so many lives just in my family alone and it is an awful disease especially since it can be so hard to detect. 25% of women have “very dense” breast tissue which makes mammograms hard to read. This is precisely why supporting education and awareness of the disease is so important. The more proactive people are and cognizant of their risks, the better they can protect themselves. We can find a greater percentage of the population taking action to get screenings as they get older and getting treatment faster if needed. Breast cancer, like any cancer, is awful, but it doesn’t have to be. We can all do our part to contribute toward mitigating its impact, if not ending the disease altogether.  Sincerely,  Molly Colburn

My maternal grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer back in 2009 at age the age of only 68. Within months, testing revealed that her cancer was stage 4, which is almost always terminal. Knowing that some of the best doctors in the world are in Boston, she moved from Florida and lived with us during her fight. My mom took her to appointments and we got to be close with her in a time where she needed us most. She battled, with hormone suppression and then a very aggressive chemo schedule, for just over a year and died at age 69. However, I always cherish those special few months we had with her under our roof.

My maternal great-grandmother also had postmenopausal breast cancer. She was diagnosed and had a lumpectomy and oral treatment. She ended up passing away from the cancer at 92.

After having two family members diagnosed, my own mom worried about her risk. After some concerns following a mammogram, she ended up needing bilateral biopsies. The results were thankfully clear she is still a 30% risk of having breast cancer, which scares her every day.

And lastly, a few years ago, my paternal aunt had suspicious spots (stage 1) and opted for a lumpectomy, as well as radiation and chemo as an extra precaution. She beat breast cancer and has been cancer-free for over 12 years, although the fear of relapse exists for all survivors.

Breast cancer has touched so many lives just in my family alone and it is an awful disease especially since it can be so hard to detect. 25% of women have “very dense” breast tissue which makes mammograms hard to read. This is precisely why supporting education and awareness of the disease is so important. The more proactive people are and cognizant of their risks, the better they can protect themselves. We can find a greater percentage of the population taking action to get screenings as they get older and getting treatment faster if needed. Breast cancer, like any cancer, is awful, but it doesn’t have to be. We can all do our part to contribute toward mitigating its impact, if not ending the disease altogether.

Sincerely,

Molly Colburn

 
 
Our philanthropy allows us to invest in something much greater than ourselves. Breast cancer is a personal cause that has marked the lives of far too many. But here at ZTA we aim to reduce its reach in any way we can through our philanthropy, breast cancer education and awareness.  While a major part of our philanthropy and service is fundraising at Iota Theta we aim to extend beyond this and promote awareness on a more personal level. As Think Pink Chair, I’ve been excited to help start a new initiative: a breast health clinic where any woman in the GT community is invited to our house to learn how to perform a self-breast exam and learn about the indications of breast cancer. Beyond that, we also table and pass out ribbons, have pink out basketball, baseball and football games, chapter talks from women within the GT community and many other breast cancer awareness events during Think Pink Week.  One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lives. Many of us know someone who has been affected and that’s why I believe we are so passionate about our cause. It is so inspiring to see how far we’ve come, and I can’t wait to see what more amazing things chapter will do.  Sincerely,  Simran Dahl

Our philanthropy allows us to invest in something much greater than ourselves. Breast cancer is a personal cause that has marked the lives of far too many. But here at ZTA we aim to reduce its reach in any way we can through our philanthropy, breast cancer education and awareness.

While a major part of our philanthropy and service is fundraising at Iota Theta we aim to extend beyond this and promote awareness on a more personal level. As Think Pink Chair, I’ve been excited to help start a new initiative: a breast health clinic where any woman in the GT community is invited to our house to learn how to perform a self-breast exam and learn about the indications of breast cancer. Beyond that, we also table and pass out ribbons, have pink out basketball, baseball and football games, chapter talks from women within the GT community and many other breast cancer awareness events during Think Pink Week.

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lives. Many of us know someone who has been affected and that’s why I believe we are so passionate about our cause. It is so inspiring to see how far we’ve come, and I can’t wait to see what more amazing things chapter will do.

Sincerely,

Simran Dahl